Category Archives: Education Policy

The Hope Gap: Helping Adult Students Overcome Barriers to Fulfilling Careers

This article first appeared in Higher Ed Today.  According to a survey commissioned by Champlain College Online, many adults aged 23 to 55 without a bachelor’s degree are dissatisfied with their careers. They are not making enough money. Their work doesn’t interest them. They have limited opportunities for advancement, or they simply want to find a better […]

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Value in Education

We see a growing disconnect between the public’s view of the cost of higher education and the value it delivers, and colleges’ own view of the value provided. A recent AACU survey highlighted here (“Well Prepared in Their Own Eyes“) notes the divergence between students’ assessment of their skills and employers’ assessment. The gap between student preparation […]

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A Measured Life

Following last week’s post, Critical Thinking, Wes Balda, Dean of the Robert P. Stiller School of Business here at Champlain College, emailed me a piece he had written a few years ago that contributes to the discussion about what education at Champlain College ought to look like. We considered posting it in the comments section, but I […]

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Critical Thinking

The Chronicle of Higher Education recently published an essay by Champlain College’s Erik Shonstrom, an Assistant Professor in our Core Division, entitled “People Over Pedagogy.” Before discussing one statement in the essay with which I have an issue, I want to congratulate Professor Shonstrom for a thoughtful piece that reflects well on the college. If you […]

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Soft Skills

Nothing sets my tiny public policy heart pitter patter faster than a new article by James Heckman in the American Economic Review. October’s issue brings an article by Heckman, Rodrigo Pinto and Peter Savelyev on “Understanding the Mechanisms Through Which an Influential Early Childhood Program Boosted Adult Outcomes.” In this latest paper, Heckman and his colleagues re-visit the […]

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Philosophical Careers

Early in my presidential career, a colleague intent on giving me a finer appreciation of higher education recommended I read some of John Dewey’s works. I dutifully purchased a couple of his books. They sat on my dresser, unread, reproaching me, until this weekend, when I picked up “Democracy and Education.” Written in 1916, Dewey’s […]

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